Bob
Bob Schultek
Author of
The Gauntlet

One of the laws governing change initiatives states that those impacted by a change separate into three groups.

One third of the group will immediately support the change. They are the spark that launches it and the energy that sustains it. They ask, “what if?” or “why?” and they’re the first to volunteer with an eager, “I’ll do it.” They are generous with their time and talent, putting in more than they take out, and surprising everyone with their level of commitment.

One third of the group will immediately reject the change. They are the doubters, paralyzed by fear of what the change could bring. They are first to voice objections, barriers and a long list of excuses why the change won’t work. They absorb the energy created by those that advocate for the change, undermining momentum until a positive pace of progress overwhelms them.

The final third are fence-sitters, passive bystanders who attend the meetings and drink the coffee, but do little to add energy to the initiative. They wait to see which group is winning before choosing a side. For a change initiative to succeed, they are the key group that the advocates must win over.

As senior leaders driving change, focus your energy on converting the bystanders.

How engaged are you in driving the change you support?
 
How can you better engage the bystanders
in the change initiative?