RobertSchultek

About Bob Schultek

Bob has more than 30 years of service as a senior sales and business development executive, CEO and business owner. His expertise includes customer-partnered business development, strategic planning, sales management, customer service, operational alignment, lean process analysis and improvement, quality assurance, and performance management. He has worked in the energy, medical device, bioscience & pharmaceutical, discrete and process manufacturing, packaging and distribution, communications and information technology, and business-to-business service industries.

Sustainability & Value Creation

Bob Schultek
Author of
The Gauntlet

The fundamental premise for business acquisitions is that the merged organizations will be more valuable together than they would be if they continued as separate entities; an acquisition is expected to create value.

Yet, a multitude of research studies cite a high failure rate for mergers. One KPMG study indicates that 83% of acquisitions fail to boost value, and another by A.T. Kearney concludes that total return on many M&A deals is often negative.

These studies consistently point to poor cultural compatibility as the root cause for this high rate of acquisition failure?

The KPMG study and others agree that value creation is more dependent on successful culture integration than on any other factor. Without a timely and extensive integration of cultures, the sustainability of the acquired business is compromised, as is the opportunity for the deal to create value.

Start the integration process right by thoroughly evaluating cultural compatibility during due diligence; and prior to assessing the target organization’s culture, ensure that you understand your own. This will enable you to make clear choices about expected behaviors and other attributes for the merged entity.

Unfortunately, of the five key due diligence parameters for acquisitions – risk, price, strategy, management capacity and culture – the least attention is typically paid to culture integration. This […]

By |August 15th, 2018|Grolistic, Growth & Leadership Insights|0 Comments

Benefits from Promises

Bob Schultek
Author of
The Gauntlet

Delivering promised benefits to a new customer communicates that you respect and value the business shared with you, and that your commitments are reliable. The customer’s confidence and trust grows, earning you consideration when the next opportunity arises.

Consistently producing promised benefits, time after time, builds customer loyalty. And when your solutions do more than resolve short term needs, when they also contribute to the customer’s progress and goal achievement, an enduring relationship is cultivated. Rewards for this level of customer commitment include recurring revenue, higher ROI on sales investment, exposure to innovation opportunities and strategic access to your customer’s senior leaders.

Finally, rewards earned from your enduring customer relationships enable you to keep promises to your people…promises of opportunity, business sustainability and job satisfaction. They also illustrate how your company makes a difference for your customers, fulfilling your purpose and enabling your people to realize the meaningfulness of their work. It’s this awareness that motivates those people to invest the extra effort necessary to launch innovations or continuously improve your business.
How do you ensure that your customers
are aware of promises kept?
 
How do you alert your people to 
customer relationship rewards you’ve earned?

By |August 7th, 2018|Grolistic, Growth & Leadership Insights|0 Comments

Sustaining Change

Bob Schultek
Author of
The Gauntlet

Because people drive change, sustaining a change initiative requires a commitment from leadership to invest significant time and energy in engaging everyone connected with the effort. By remaining personally involved, modelling behaviors that support the change, and focusing more on why the change is essential than what is changing, leaders can preserve the vision of desired outcome or common goal.

They lead by exhibiting 3 qualities:

1. They remove barriers to success. These can be personal barriers such as fear of change, sense of loss, or wounded egos, and they can be organizational constraints like the time and resources necessary to carry out the change plan, or keeping key stakeholders connected to the vision of successful change through progress updates. Without this support, their peoples’ commitment to the change will waiver.

2. They adapt as they learn. Remaining deeply engaged means asking questions and gathering feedback to acquire accurate information that allows these leaders to make continual adjustments during the change initiative. Adjustments can involve keeping key people involved, breaking a larger initiative into smaller components to build momentum, or refining metrics to better monitor progress.

3. They cultivate collaboration. By encouraging their people to break out of their silos and work cross-functionally to resolve problems and […]

By |August 1st, 2018|Grolistic, Growth & Leadership Insights|0 Comments

Opportunity from Disruption

Bob Schultek
Author of
The Gauntlet

Change often leaves disruption in its wake. When that disruption is personal, it can be unsettling and disheartening; the sense that you have no control can paralyze decision-making.

Regaining control begins by recognizing the opportunity hidden within your challenge and moving forward to exploit it.

One of my associates recently shared the following quote about such situations from the book “A Joseph Campbell Companion: Reflections on the Art of Living” by Joseph Campbell. When disruptive change is personal, this message can sustain you.

“Nietzsche was the one who did the job for me. At a certain moment in his life, the idea came to him of what he called ‘the love of your fate.’ Whatever your fate is, whatever the hell happens, you say, ‘This is what I need.’ It may look like a wreck, but go at it as though it were an opportunity, a challenge. If you bring love to that moment-not discouragement-you will find the strength is there. Any disaster that you can survive is an improvement in your character, your stature, and your life. What a privilege! This is when the spontaneity of your own nature will have a chance to flow. 

 Then, when looking back at your life, you will […]

By |July 25th, 2018|Grolistic, Growth & Leadership Insights|0 Comments

3 Growth Culture Drivers

Bob Schultek
Author of 
The Gauntlet

Organizations that sustain profitable growth tend to demonstrate three cultural drivers.

They are guided by their Purpose Motive. The organization understands how it contributes to its customers’ strategic progress, beyond providing quality products and exceptional service. Because its people realize how they make a difference, they are motivated to invest extra effort, strengthening offerings and operations to sustain their progress.

They are committed to Innovation. The business recognizes that innovation fuels its purpose by enabling its customers’ progress, and therefore, its own. Innovations with the highest probability of success are derived by creating a new product or service that resolves a customer’s challenge, fulfilling a strategic goal.

They foster a culture of Shared Accountability. These organizations consistently clarify that their progress depends on achieving their mutual goals in a manner consistent with their expected behaviors. Rewards are team-based, not driven by individual accomplishment. Team members trust in their shared purpose which promotes respect for one another, enabling them to productively challenge each other’s ideas on how best to promptly and efficiently resolve problems or overcome barriers. This leads to faster decision-making, improved performance and better results.

How impactful are these 3 drivers in your organization’s culture?
 
How could they accelerate the growth of your business?

By |July 9th, 2018|Grolistic, Growth & Leadership Insights|0 Comments

Why Buy the Quarter-Inch Drill?

Bob Schultek
Author of
The Gauntlet

“The customer rarely buys what the company thinks it is selling him.” Peter Drucker

“People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill. They want a quarter-inch hole.” Theodore Levitt

Customers don’t care about products or services – they want solutions.

Developing a creative, satisfactory solution to a vital, unmet customer need is the origin of many businesses. But as it matures, the business often loses its focus on how it makes a difference for the customer, how it produces value that helps the customer succeed. Companies begin to define themselves in terms of the products or services they sell, rather than by the unique solutions delivered to meet a customer’s crucial need.

This is a natural evolution, typically driven by readily available data generated as a company monitors the products or services sold and the resulting profit produced. It’s much easier to track quantifiable sales or production data than it is to evaluate quantifiable benefits produced for customers. And as more is invested to improve existing products or services, or to increase the efficiency of the operations used to produce them, the pressure grows to pay even more attention to the accessible, operational data than to the customer experience.

It is true that the most […]

By |July 3rd, 2018|Grolistic, Growth & Leadership Insights|0 Comments

Why Teams Bond

Bob Schultek
Author of
The Gauntlet

Teams bond when they struggle together to accomplish an objective. Every military, athletic and business leader knows this truth and relies upon it.

Why do team members choose to join in the struggle?

Accomplishing the objective is meaningful. The struggle provides a unique opportunity to make a difference, to contribute to a vital, significant endeavor.

Participating enables mastery. Struggling with the team to overcome barriers enables the mastery of individual strengths that increase satisfaction, self-confidence and self-worth.

Experiencing autonomy drives accountability.
Sharing the responsibility for decision-making, and for the consequences of decisions, increases accountability, engagement, innovation and the motivation to invest whatever energy and talent is necessary to secure a successful outcome.

Since leaders cannot compel teams to bond, they must create the conditions for the bonding to occur. The commitment eventually made by each team member cultivates a shared accountability within the team that drives performance and improves results.

How do you encourage your teams to bond?
 
What might be done differently to strengthen team bonds?

By |June 27th, 2018|Grolistic, Growth & Leadership Insights|0 Comments

Why Innovations Succeed

Bob Schultek
Author of 
The Gauntlet

The pursuit of innovation is a vitally important strategy for organizations seeking to accelerate their progress. Companies dedicate significant time, energy and investment to it, often optimizing the efficiency of their innovation process with the goal of improving their success rate. But what if this effort does not improve their ability to predict which innovations will succeed?

As Dr. W. Edwards Deming, the renowned quality and management expert observed, every process is perfectly designed to deliver the results it gets. If an organization views its pursuit of innovation as imperfect and unpredictable, relying on assumptions about what customers need, what competitors are doing, or perhaps on a bit of luck, then it builds processes that operationalize the perception of a hit or miss proposition. The results of these processes are predictable – mediocrity and disappointment.

Improving the success rate of innovation starts with asking your customers about their strategies, their barriers, and what job they need you to do so they can achieve their goals. The insights you gain will increase your innovation predictability, and improve your results.

What is your innovation success rate?
 
How frequently do you have strategic discussions with key customers?

By |June 19th, 2018|Grolistic, Growth & Leadership Insights|0 Comments

3 Attributes That Increase Your Value to Customers

Bob Schultek
Author of
The Gauntlet

In a commoditized market, why do customers choose to build enduring relationships with some suppliers? It’s all about the strategic value you produce for them.

Customers cite 3 attributes that increase your value:
1.   Reliability

Customers expect you to keep your promises–it’s the price of admission into the relationship. If your team makes it easy to do business, perhaps delivering exceptional service as well, then your value is increased. What drives value even higher is learning about a customer’s business so you can anticipate needs and solve emerging problems. Treat them as you want to be treated, with personal attention that communicates your respect for the business they share with you.

2.  Generosity

Generosity is the genesis of trust. Learn your customers’ stories and aspirations. Then share ideas, trends and suggestions that can accelerate their progress, without expectation of an immediate sale. Your openness and generosity will further reinforce your value to them.
 
3.   Vulnerability
Personal interactions are the glue that bonds relationships – people want to buy from people. When your people share their stories and personal insights, their vulnerability is revealed, making it easier for a customer to recognize authenticity and build trust. Asking about a customer’s interests or family, or discussing a shared experience, […]

By |June 13th, 2018|Grolistic, Growth & Leadership Insights|0 Comments

Prioritizing Opportunities

Bob Schultek
Author of
The Gauntlet

Promptly and efficiently evaluating multiple business opportunities can accelerate your reaction to them; move too slowly and the best opportunities may vanish.

Ask these three questions for each opportunity to prioritize the alternatives by potential strategic value produced for your business:

What quantifiable benefits are produced if the opportunity is successfully exploited?
How soon will these benefits be realized?
How likely will identified obstacles be quickly overcome?

This prioritization will enable you to invest precious resources only on those opportunities that can drive growth, improve results and accelerate progress.

How promptly and efficiently does your organization assess opportunities?
 
How might these three questions accelerate your process and decision-making?

By |May 30th, 2018|Grolistic, Growth & Leadership Insights|0 Comments